Summary the kite runner by khaled

Along the way, readers are able to experience growing up in Afghanistan in a single-parent home, a situation that bears remarkable similarities to many contemporary households. One of the biggest struggles for Amir is learning to navigate the complex socioeconomic culture he faces, growing up in Afghanistan as a member of the privileged class yet not feeling like a privileged member of his own family. Many of the ruling-class elite in Afghanistan view the world as black and white, yet Amir identifies many shades of gray.

Summary the kite runner by khaled

He was motivated to write a page short story about two boys who fly kites in Kabul. The parallels are pretty obvious, but I left a few things ambiguous because I wanted to drive the book clubs crazy.

A lot of my childhood friends had a very hard time.

SparkNotes: The Kite Runner: Plot Overview

Some of our cousins died. One died in a fuel truck trying to escape Afghanistan [an incident that Hosseini fictionalises in The Kite Runner]. He was one of the kids I grew up with flying kites. His father was shot. Hassan is a successful "kite runner" for Amir; he knows where the kite will land without watching it.

Amir's mother passed away of illness when he was an infant while Hassan's mother simply abandoned him. Amir's father, a wealthy merchant Amir affectionately refers to as Baba, loves both boys. He makes a point of buying Hassan exactly the same things as Amir much to Amir's annoyance.

He even pays to have Hassan's cleft palate surgically corrected. On the other hand Baba jan is often critical of Amir, considering him weak and lacking in courage, even threatening to physically punish him when he complains about Hassan.

Amir finds a kinder fatherly figure in Rahim Khan, Baba's closest friend, who understands him and supports his interest in writing, whereas Baba considers that interest to be worthy only of females. In a rare moment when Amir is sitting on Baba jan's lap, he asks why his father drinks alcohol which is forbidden by Islam.

Baba jan tells him that the Imans are hypocrites and the only real sin is theft. Assef, an older boy with a sadistic taste for violence, mocks Amir for socializing with a Hazara, which according to him, is an inferior race whose members belong only in Hazarajat.

Notably Assef is himself only half Pashtun having a German mother and a typical blond haired blue eyed German appearance. One day, he prepares to attack Amir with brass knucklesbut Hassan defends Amir, threatening to shoot out Assef's eye with his slingshot.

Assef backs off but swears to take revenge one day. One triumphant day, Amir wins the local kite fighting tournament and finally earns Baba's praise. Hassan runs for the last cut kite, a great trophy, saying to Amir, "For you, a thousand times over. Hassan refuses to give up the kite, and Assef severely beats him and rapes him.

Amir witnesses the act but is too scared to intervene. He knows that if he fails to bring home the kite, Baba would be less proud of him. He feels incredibly guilty but knows his cowardice would destroy any hopes for Baba's affections, so he keeps quiet about the incident.

Afterwards, Amir keeps distant from Hassan; his feelings of guilt prevent him from interacting with the boy. Amir begins to believe that life would be easier if Hassan were not around, so he plants a watch and some money under Hassan's mattress in hopes that Baba will make him leave; Hassan falsely confesses when confronted by Baba.

Although Baba believes "there is no act more wretched than stealing", he forgives him. To Baba's sorrow, Hassan and Ali leave anyway. Amir is freed of the daily reminder of his cowardice and betrayal, but he still lives in their shadow. Baba and Amir escape to PeshawarPakistanand then to Fremont, Californiawhere they settle in a run-down apartment.

Baba begins work at a gas station. After graduating from high school, Amir takes classes at San Jose State University to develop his writing skills. There, Amir meets fellow refugee Soraya Taheri and her family.

Summary the kite runner by khaled

Baba is diagnosed with terminal cancer but is still capable of granting Amir one last favor: He agrees and the two marry. Shortly thereafter Baba dies.

Overview of The Kite Runner PDF

Amir and Soraya settle down in a happy marriage, but to their sorrow, they learn that they cannot have children. Amir embarks on a successful career as a novelist.The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini details a life story of a young boy, Amir who grows up looking for redemption as a result of his betrayal to his half-brother Hassan.

Throughout the novel, Hosseini delves into the mind of Amir who, in the beginning of the novel, is a young boy living with his father and best friend/half brother in Kabul /5(6K).

In such a complex novel, it is difficult to give a summary. I will have to be selective. As I see it, there are four main points. First, Amir, the protagonist is telling a . The Kite Runner is the first novel by Afghan-American author Khaled Hosseini.

Published in by Riverhead Books, it tells the story of Amir, a young boy from the Wazir Akbar Khan district of Kabul, whose closest friend is Hassan. Summary. Chapter 1 opens with the words "December " A nameless narrator immediately refers back to the winter of , when the narrator "became what I am today" and obliquely mentions an event that occurred .

Ultimately, The Kite Runner is a novel about relationships — specifically the relationships between Amir and Hassan, Baba, Rahim Khan, Soraya, and Sohrab — and how the complex relationships in our lives overlap and connect to make us the people we are.

The Kite Runner is the story of Amir, a Sunni Muslim, who struggles to find his place in the world because of the aftereffects and fallout from a series of traumatic childhood events. An adult Amir opens the novel in the present-day United States with a vague reference to one of these events, and.

The Kite Runner Summary - plombier-nemours.com